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About the contributor
Shawna McAlearney

Shawna McAlearney is the Marketing Specialist for Appligent Document Solutions.
More contributions
Have we passed ‘peak PDF’?

How do we gain insight into how users’ views of documents are shifting? Google Trends is an increasingly interesting source of high-level marketplace data. By aggregating Google’s search data over time, reporting a term’s popularity as compared with all other searches.

Participating in the PDF Techniques Accessibility Summit

The PDF Techniques Accessibility Summit’s objective is to establish a broad-based understanding of how PDF files should be tagged for accessibilty. It’s an opportunity to focus on establishing a common set of examples of accessible PDF content, and identify best-practice when tagging difficult cases.

Members supporting PDF features!

The typical adoption curve for PDF technologies until approximately 2007 tended to track with that of the original PDF developer. Since then the marketplace has shifted; it’s no longer clear that Adobe drivesPDF feature support worldwide. Accordingly, we are happy to report that adoption of PDF 2.0 continues apace, with new vendors announcing their support every month.

Modernizing PDF Techniques for Accessibility

The PDF Techniques Accessibility Summit will identify best-practices in tagging various cases in PDF documents. Questions to be addressed will likely include: the legal ways to tag a nested list, the correct way to caption multiple images, the appropriate way to organize content within headings.

Refried PDF

My hospital emailed me a medical records release form as a PDF. They told me to print it, fill it, sign it, scan it and return it to the medical records department, in that order. In 2018? To get the form via email (i.e., electronically), yet be asked to print it? Did the last 20 years just… not mean anything! So I thought I’d be clever. I’d fill it first, THEN print it. Or better yet, never print it, but sign it anyhow, and return it along with a note making the case for improving their workflow. The story continues…

Benefits and Limitations of Using iTunes to Organize PDFs

If you have lots of PDF files on your Mac and are worried about dealing with “a cluttered mess” as CNET’s Topher Kessler puts it, you have options. In addition to spotlight’s indexing, smart folders or consolidating the files in one location, iTunes can also be used to manage a library of PDF documents.

Kessler looks at the merits of using iTunes to organize PDFs, as well as other Apple media support options. “Besides options that are built into OS X, there are a few programs out there that can help not only organize PDFs, but also other documents and information on your system,” writes Kessler. “One of these is the tool iDocument, which is very similar to iTunes, but is tailored for documents instead of media.

Other options include Yojimbo, which is a long-standing information organizer for OS X, and Yep, which was created by the developers of the popular maintenance program MacKeeper.”


Tags: Mac, iTunes, organize
Categories: PDF