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PDF Association

Mission Statement: To promote Open Standards-based electronic document implementations using PDF technology through education, expertise and shared experience for stakeholders worldwide.
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Modernizing PDF Techniques for Accessibility

The PDF Techniques Accessibility Summit will identify best-practices in tagging various cases in PDF documents. Questions to be addressed will likely include: the legal ways to tag a nested list, the correct way to caption multiple images, the appropriate way to organize content within headings.

Refried PDF

My hospital emailed me a medical records release form as a PDF. They told me to print it, fill it, sign it, scan it and return it to the medical records department, in that order. In 2018? To get the form via email (i.e., electronically), yet be asked to print it? Did the last 20 years just… not mean anything! So I thought I’d be clever. I’d fill it first, THEN print it. Or better yet, never print it, but sign it anyhow, and return it along with a note making the case for improving their workflow. The story continues…

Slides and video recordings of PDF Days Europe 2018

You missed the PDF Days Europe 2018? Never mind! Here you can find the slides and video recordings of all 32 stunning sessions!

Using PDF/UA in accessibility checklists

PDF/UA, like PDF itself, is internally complex, but used correctly, actually makes things easier.

PDF Association expands its board of directors

Catherine Andersz of PDFTron Systems, Alaine Behler of iText Software and Peter Wyatt, ISO Project Leader for ISO 32000 enrich the newly elected board of the PDF Association.

Announcing the Structure Elements Best Practice Guide 0.1.1

Screenshot of the cover of the 0.1 release of the Structure Elements Best Practice GuidePDF/UA is a very technical document because PDF contains many distinct and complex data-structures, many of which are outside the typical knowledge-base of web-technology centered accessibility professionals.

PDF/UA, the ISO standard for accessible PDF technology, is written for software developers, not for authors, or even for those tasked with checking documents for accessibility.

By focussing on the rules of accessibility from the software-development point of view, PDF/UA’s objective is to help developers bake many of the rules directly into the software, allowing authors to create accessible documents using familiar tools such as styling.

To help make PDF/UA accessible to its intended audience, as well as to the larger population interested in the specifics of accessible PDF, the PDF Association’s PDF/UA Competence Center produced the first edition of the Matterhorn Protocol in 2013. This document packages PDF/UA into a table of requirements, which is useful, but does not provide much in the way of advice for those creating user-interfaces for authoring systems, or for authors themselves.

To meet this need the PDF/UA Competence Center began to develop, in February 2014, a PDF Structure Elements Best Practice Guide. The objective of this document is to promote a detailed understanding of the correct use of PDF technology and to make that technology more comprehensible to accessibility experts rooted in web technologies.

The document is by no means complete; there are subsections to be added and more to be reviewed and revised. We have reached a stage, however, where the document is ready for independent input.

Accordingly, we are now posting the current draft (updated 2016-01-19) of the PDF Structure Elements Best Practice Guide v0.1 for immediate download. NOTE: This early draft, although tagged, does not conform to PDF/UA.

We hope readers will provide us with any and all comments on this document to help us improve it. Please feel free to email your comments or questions to the chair of the PDF/UA Competence Center at duff.johnson@pdfa.org.


Tags: Best practice, accessibility, tagged PDF
Categories: PDF/UA