Monthly Archives: November 2010

The PDF/A Family – Martin Bailey, Global Graphics (Part 2 of 2)

What are the requirements, conformance levels and timelines associated with implementing PDF/A, the industry standard for archiving PDFs for long-term preservation? [...]

The PDF/A Family – Martin Bailey, Global Graphics (Part 1 of 2)

What are the requirements, conformance levels and timelines associated with implementing PDF/A, the industry standard for archiving PDFs for long-term preservation? [...]

German Insurance Company Automates Email Archiving for Claims Management

Interact Consulting was appointed by a large German insurance provider to automate the email archiving process for personal email belonging to its claims handlers. The new solution should enable claims handlers to induce the import process for personal email considered worthy of archiving, thereby triggering the archiving process. The challenge lay in developing an automated archiving process for the many millions of emails per year. The choice fell on the solution from PDF Tools AG due to the high throughput rate, stability and reliability of its 3‑Heights™ Document Converter Service. [...]

German Insurance Company Automates Email Archiving for Claims Management

Interact Consulting was appointed by a large German insurance provider to automate the email archiving process for personal email belonging to its claims handlers. The new solution should enable claims handlers to induce the import process for personal email considered worthy of archiving, thereby triggering the archiving process. The challenge lay in developing an automated archiving process for the many millions of emails per year. The choice fell on the solution from PDF Tools AG due to the high throughput rate, stability and reliability of its 3‑Heights™ Document Converter Service. [...]

A screen-shot showing a simple example of how painting order and logical order may differ.

A PDF Page Is a Painting

When you create a PDF, you’re painting a picture. There’s no logical connection between the letters comprising a word; characters simply happen at a series of locations on the rendered page. Why does this matter? [...]